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Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Yanina Purim-Shem-Tov

Rush University Medical Center, USA

Keynote: Medicaid beneficiaries who continue to use the ED: A focus on the Illinois medical home network

Time : 09:00-09:35

OMICS International Public Health 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yanina Purim-Shem-Tov photo
Biography:

Yanina Purim-Shem-Tov graduated from the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine in 1998; completed emergency medicine residency at Cook County Hospital, in 2002, and began full-time employment at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC). She has completed Master’s Program in Clinical Research in 2006. Her Master Thesis focused on patients with chest pain, whom were admitted to the Emergency Department Observation Unit, a published manuscript. Presently, she is a Senior Medical Director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at RUMC. She is an NIH-supported researcher, clinician, and an educator. I have numerous publications in the areas of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract:

Objectives: Frequent, non-urgent emergency department use continues to plague the American healthcare system through ineffective disease management and unnecessary costs. In 2012, the Illinois Medical Home Network (MHN) was implemented, in part, to reduce an overreliance on already stressed emergency departments through better care coordination and access to primary care. The purpose of this study is to characterize MHN patients and compare them to non-MHN patients for a preliminary understanding of MHN patients who visit the emergency department. Variables of interest include: 1) frequency of emergency department use during the previous twelve months; 2) demographic characteristics; 3) acuity; 4) disposition; and 5) comorbidities. rnrnMethods: We performed a retrospective data analysis of all emergency department visits at a large, urban academic medical center in 2013. Binary logistic regression analyses and analysis of variance were used to analyze data. rnrnResults: MHN patients visited the emergency department more often than non-MHN patients. MHN patients were more likely to be African American, Hispanic/Latino, female, and minors when compared with non-MHN patients. Greater proportions of MHN patients visiting the emergency department had asthma diagnoses. MHN patients possessed higher acuity but were more likely to be discharged from the emergency department compared with non-MHN patients. rnrnConclusions: This research may assist with developing and evaluating intervention strategies targeting the reduction of health disparities through decreased use of emergency department services in these traditionally underserved populations.rn

Keynote Forum

Jara Pérez-Jiménez

Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Spain

Keynote: Antioxidant capacity of the Spanish Mediterranean diet: A whole approach including macromolecular antioxidants

Time : 09:35-10:10

OMICS International Public Health 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jara Pérez-Jiménez photo
Biography:

Jara Pérez-Jiménez completed her PhD in 2007. She has worked in several research centers and universities in Spain and France focused on the study of food bioactive compounds, in particular polyphenols, using a multidisciplinary approach. These research activities have given place to more than 45 papers in international scientific journals (>1,600 citations, h-index: 21), as well as to more than 50 works presented in scientific meetings and invited conferences in different universities. She is a member of the Editorial Board of Food Research International, as well as Academic Editor of PeerJ.

Abstract:

Epidemiological and clinical studies show that diets with a high antioxidant capacity (AC) reduce the overall risk of cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases or certain kinds of cancer. However, these studies focus exclusively on low molecular weight or soluble antioxidants (vitamins C and E, phenolic compounds and carotenoids), ignoring macromolecular antioxidants. These are polymeric phenolic compounds or polyphenols and carotenoids linked to plant food macromolecules that yield bio-available metabolites by the action of the micro-biota, with beneficial effects either local and/or systemic after absorption. The aim of this work was to estimate the AC of a whole diet -the Spanish Mediterranean Diet (MD) considering for the first time both soluble and macromolecular antioxidants. Plant food and beverage consumptions in the Spanish diet were based on national 2013 data obtained from 12,000 daily household spending questionnaires. From this, 54 food and beverages were selected and soluble and macromolecular antioxidants were obtained. Antioxidant capacity was measured in both fractions by two complementary methods and expressed in Trolox equivalents- the standard units for AC. From these data, it was obtained that total AC of the Spanish MD was 8,000 µmol Trolox/p/day with the 61% provided by macromolecular antioxidants. Therefore, the first determination of Antioxidant Capacity in a diet (Spanish MD) including macromolecular antioxidants shows that these commonly ignored compounds are major contributors to total AC. Including macromolecular antioxidants in mechanistic, intervention and observational studies on dietary antioxidants may contribute to a better understanding of the role of antioxidants in nutrition and health.rnrn

  • Nutrition and Health Education
    Public Health Nutrition
    Nutrition and Metabolism
    Nutrition and Non-Communicable Diseases
Speaker

Chair

Yanina Purim-Shem-Tov

Rush University Medical Center, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Jara Pérez-Jiménez

Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Spain

Session Introduction

Valerie Bertrand

Hospital Jacques Monod, France

Title: Systematic nutritional evaluation increases financing of hospital care in children

Time : 10:15-10:40

Biography:

Valerie Bertrand has completed his PhD at the age of 25 years from Caen University and postdoctoral studies from Lyon University School of Medicine. She works in Le Havre Hospital as gastro-pediatrician.

Abstract:

Children’s malnutrition screening is not systematic in many hospitals. The aim of our study was to screen all children in our center, describe their nutritional status, and calculate the financial valuation of the malnutrition's coding, according pricing activity (T2A). We did a cross-sectional study during 3 months in 3 pediatric units. A child was undernourished when weight/theoretical weight for height was <90% and was overweight when the body mass index z-score> +2 SD (Sempé/Rolland-Cachera graphs). The amount of coding's financial valuation was calculated according the CIM-10 classification. Statistic analysis was done with the IBM-SPSS version 20.0 software (Student’s t test corrected, ANOVA, χ2 test). Among 738 children were hospitalized, 8.4% were undernourished, 7.2% were overweight, and 84.4% had good nutritional status. More than 80% had no previous nutritional care. Overweight children were older (9,9 ±5,2 years) than undernourished children (5,9 ± 5,1 years) or children with good nutritional status (5,9 ± 5,6 years) (p<0.001). Longer hospital stays were observed in undernourished children (4,6 ± 3 years) or overweight children (3,6 ±2,4 years), than children with good nutritional status (3,2 ± 2,8 years) (p<0.001). Undernourished children had more chronic diseases than the others (p<0.001). The amount of malnutrition coding’s financial valuation was positive (+34%). In conclusion, our study shows it’s possible to associate a nutritional screening to hospital’s care project. The observed frequency of malnutrition was in the lower range of data available in the literature. Our initiative helps improve the care of hospitalized children.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:40-11:00 @ Salamanca
Speaker
Biography:

Nida Tokac Er has completed her Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics from Hacettepe University. She is pursuing her Master’s degree in the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at Ankara University. Also, she is a Research Assistant at the same University.

Abstract:

Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease and it needs to be aware of severity or precautions. It is likely to have a profound effect on physical activity level and calcium intake. The aim of this study is to examine knowledge of osteoporosis (OP), health behaviours, and health beliefs among a sample of women working in different branch banks in Ankara, Turkey. Women completed a self-administered questionnaire providing age, weight, height and demographic profile data. The Osteoporosis Knowledge Assessment Tool (OKAT) and International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) One-Minute OP Risk Test administered to a 200 randomly selected, sedentary occupied women aged 21-54 years. OKAT contains 20 item instrument with true, false and don’t know responses. The analysis was fulfilled by scoring 1 for a correct response and 0 for an incorrect or don’t know response. The total score range was from 0 to 20. Other risk test includes 19 questions and analysis was performed by scoring 1 for a correct response and 0 for an incorrect response. The more women’s age and body mass index, the more risk of OP (p<0.01). The status of education is related to OP risk. Women graduating from high school had more risk compared to upper level educated women (p<0.05). The majority of women seemed to be largely unaware of the potential threat of OP, especially targeting younger women, to cease progression of OP or carry a step further for any preventative interventions.

Speaker
Biography:

Pongsom Luanghirun is a 5th year medical student enrolling at Phramongkutklao College of Medicine in Bangkok. He graduated from Mahidol Wittayanusorn School in Nakhon Pathom for his high school. He is a President of Journal and Public Relation Club and a member of Foreign Affair Club in Phramongkutklao medical cadet union.

Abstract:

In Thailand, 67.2% of the population widely uses painkiller including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that may cause fatal side effects.The finding from the United States of America indicated that 12.1% took NSAIDs at least 3 times per week for more than 3 months (regular users). However, the data on NSAIDs used in Thailand is limited. The cross-sectional study was then designed to study the prevalence of NSAIDs used and also the associated factors using standardized questionnaire. The qualitative study was also conducted to assess factors involving the use of NSAIDs by interviewing two groups; regular used NSAIDs and non-regular used NSAIDs. In-depth interviewing with 3 groups: grocery stores, pharmacy stores, and public health centers was also conducted. Of 771 participants revealed that prevalence of NSAIDs used was 31.1% and prevalence of regularly use was 7.4%. Income, pain at elbows, pain at the hip and the thighs, and pain scores were the factors associated with the usage of the drug. The qualitative study indicated that factors involved in the usage of NSAIDs were drug effectiveness, access to the public health service, and consideration of benefits and risks of the drug. Despite the knowledge of risk and hazard, rural people were using NSAIDs widely indicated that they were unaware of the effect and problem of taking this sort of medication.

Biography:

Dr Felix Ogbo obtained his Bachelor of Medicine; Bachelor of Surgery and a Master in Health Management from the University of Benin and Benue State University, Nigeria, respectively, where he gained both clinical and research experiences. Dr Ogbo has also completed a Master of Public Health (with Distinction) from Western Sydney University (WSU), and currently, pursuing a PhD at WSU focused on infant and young child feeding practices in low- and middle-income countries, particularly in Nigeria. Dr Ogbo has published peer reviewed articles and has presented in conferences/seminars in this domain.

Abstract:

In Nigeria – African largest economy and population, including 40 million children – a range of programs and policies were initiated in the 1990s to improve infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices. However, the prevalence of children fed in accordance with IYCF recommendations in Nigeria remains low. This paper presents time-trends in breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices in Nigeria for the period (1999-2013), and considers trends in the context of key national policy responses and initiatives. Prevalence (and 95% confidence intervals) of IYCF indicators were investigated over the period 1999-2013 based on a total of 88,152 maternal responses from the Nigeria demographic and health surveys, (N= 8,199 in 1999; N=7,620 in 2003; N= 33,385 in 2008 and N=38,948 in 2013). Among the core IYCF indicators, a decreasing prevalence of early initiation of breastfeeding was evident in the study period (from 38% in 1999 to 34% in 2013), while EBF remained relatively low (16% on the average). An increasing trend in minimum meal frequency was observed (41% in 2003 to 52% in 2013). Of the optional indicators, an increasing trend in predominant breastfeeding (a risk factor for diarrhoeal diseases) was evident (from 39% in 1999 to 52% in 2013), and the proportion of infants fed with a bottle remained relatively unchanged over time. Despite considerable improvements in national legislation, health system responses and community level development, IYCF practices in Nigeria are still below expected levels. Strengthening community and facility-based participation, and broader stand-alone/integrated IYCF policies are needed to improve the current feeding practices of Nigerian mothers.

Speaker
Biography:

Phonphruet Kumtree has completed his secondary school from Samsenwittayalai, Bangkok, Thailand. He always was a master of Ceremony in English for his school. Furthermore, he got a full scholarship as an exchange student for three years in a row. As a result, he was honoured as a paragon by his high school. He is now a 5th year student in Phramongkutklao College of Medicine. At the same period, he also is selected to be the class commander of his medical year. He is eager to fulfill his research focusing on the impact of peer influence towards early sexual activity.

Abstract:

Sexual activity in adolescents remains a major problem with its considerable negative health outcomes. An understanding of the predictors of early sexual activity is important for effective intervention. Yet the information regarding this issue is limited in the Thai context. This study, therefore, aims to determine the prevalence and associates of early sexual initiation among school adolescents in Thailand. A cross-sectional survey was conducted during November 2015. Demographics and risky sexual behaviors were obtained by using computer-assisted self-interview (CASI). Logistic regression was performed to investigate the factors related to sexual experience. Of the 702 students surveyed, 183 (26.1%) reported lifetime sexual intercourse. Out of those sexually active students, 75 (41.0%) reported having multiple sex partners, and only 51 (27.9%) reported a regular use of condoms. The average age of sexual debut was 14.9 years (standard deviation = 2.3). After controlling for the potential confounders, we found that the factors associated with early sexual activity were including: age (OR=1.86; 95% CI=1.64-2.12; p<0.001), academic achievement (OR=0.65; 95% CI=0.46-0.92; p=0.02), parental status (AOR=1.57; 95% CI=1.04-2.36; p<0.03), have seen pornography (AOR=2.35; 95% CI=1.27-4.35; p<0.01), peers have had sex (OR=3.28; 95% CI=1.74-6.19; p<0.001), peers have had recreational drug use (OR=3.04; 95% CI=1.27-7.28; p<0.01). The study found a high prevalence of early sexual activity among secondary school students in rural community of Thailand together with correlates mentioned above. Thereby, interventions emphasizing on the reduction of peer delinquency and substance use should be developed and implemented.

Speaker
Biography:

Regina Esiovwa Ahumareze is an experienced Pharmacist with a Distinction in Drug Discovery (MSc) from the School of Pharmacy, University of London. She worked for several years as the Superintendent Pharmacist at a reputable Nutraceutical company in Nigeria and she is particularly interested in the role of Nutraceuticals in disease prevention. Regina Esiovwa Ahumareze is the recipient of many awards including the Niger Delta Development Scholarship Award, the Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Award and the Delta State Scholarship Award. She is currently a PhD Researcher at the University of the West of Scotland.

Abstract:

Micronutrient deficiencies in people living with HIV (PLHIV) have been reported. Multivitamins can be used to address micronutrient deficiencies, however the benefits of multivitamins on health outcomes of PLHIV remain debateable. While some studies have reported the benefits of multivitamins in PLHIV, other studies have reported non-significant differences in outcomes of interest in control and multivitamin groups. With obvious differences in strength and composition of multivitamins used in the different studies, it is possible that the intervention (multivitamins) used for some of these studies may not have been dosed high enough to meet the level of micronutrient deficiencies in study participants resulting in non-significant results. It is possible that higher strength multivitamins may better meet existing micronutrient deficiencies resulting in better health outcomes in PLHIV. Hence we are currently conducting a double blind randomized controlled study in Lagos, Nigeria to compare three multivitamins. • Multivitamin A: Contains micronutrients at recommended daily allowance (RDA) • Multivitamin B: Contains 22 micronutrients at RDA • Multivitamin C:Contains 22 micronutrients at 3times the RDA The aim of this six months study is to determine if any of the three multivitamins will produce better health outcomes in study participants. Participants are HIV positive children aged 5 – 12 years. Primary outcome is changes in CD4 count, and secondary outcomes are changes in serum selenium and zinc levels. Baseline and midpoint samples have been collected and are being analysed. Final samples will be collected from December 2015 – January 2016. Results of this study will be presented at the conference.

Speaker
Biography:

Annop Kittithaworn is a 5th year medical cadet at Phramongkutklao College of Medicine. Moreover, he is fascinated with researches in cardiovascular and metabolic illness. In the near future, he plans to do further research of this topic by qualitative method to investigate main factors and causes which are the key aspects of Diabetes Mellitus in Thai rural community.

Abstract:

Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading public health issues worldwide. In 2014, WHO reported 9% of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in population aged above 18 years old and this tends to increase every year. Data from many countries also report similar trend and risk factors, such as age, gender, BMI, underlying diseases and medications. However, most studies were based on urban communities while only few were conducted in rural communities. This study aims to investigate the incidence and risk factors of type 2 DM in rural communities, central Thailand. A cohort study was conducted with 700 participants, who had been undiagnosed with diabetes and still live in the community. Participants were tested for type 2 DM using plasma glucose level at baseline in 2008 and at follow-up visit in 2015. Health behaviors and socioeconomic characteristics were collected by standardized questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk factors for type 2 DM. A total of 131 individuals developed type 2 DM during 5,323 person-years of follow-up period. The incidence of type 2 DM was 25 per 1000 person-years. The factors associated with development of type 2 DM include gender, age, had family history of type 2 DM, impaired fasting blood glucose, waist circumference and high blood pressure which the adjusted hazard ratio were 1.77 (95% CI: 1.18-2.67), 1.02 (95% CI: 1.00-1.04), 1.84 (95% CI: 1.27-2.69), 4.08 (95% CI: 2.73-6.08), 1.75 (95% CI: 1.02-3.02) and 1.69 (95% CI: 1.04-2.75), respectively. According to this data, it is suggested that early detection is the most effective way for reducing the rise in type 2 diabetes mellitus cases.

Speaker
Biography:

João PM Lima is 25 years old. Ph D student in Food Consumption and Nutrition and graduated in Nutrion Sciences. Nutritionist and Teacher of Nutrition subject in School of Hospitality and Tourism of Coimbra since 2013 and in Institute of Employment and Professional Training - Águeda since 2015.

Abstract:

Health promotion activities in the workplace may be more effective and targeted if the key drivers and motivations of food consumption are identified. This work aims to identify health promotion strategies at the workplace pointed out as more interesting by employees of a faculty of the University of Porto. Data was obtained through the application of a self-administrated questionnaire. There were assessed 49 individuals, either academic and non-academic workers. The majority of respondents classified as extremely interesting the 'free access to water', 'free distribution of fruit in the workplace' and 'healthy choices at meals available in the restaurant/bar'. More than 20% of employees identified the strategies 'cooking classes', 'access to health promotion materials such as leaflets and posters that promote healthy eating', 'access to messages about healthy eating weekly via email and/or bulletin boards' and 'weight management programs' as extremely uninteresting or uninteresting. Differences were found according to type of activity and academic degree concerning the interest in 'cooking classes' and 'training, lectures and workshops about healthy eating for health professionals such as nutritionists or dietitians'. 'Access to messages about healthy eating weekly via email and/or bulletin boards' was also influenced by respondents' type of activity. This work shows that strategies related to food availability were considered by respondents as the most interesting in opposite to strategies related to nutrition literacy that seem to be considered uninteresting. Differences found according to the type of activity and academic degree on interest in strategies point to the need of adapting specific interventions to different target groups.

Speaker
Biography:

Siravich Thamthitiwat is a 5th year medical student enrolling at Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, Bangkok. He graduated from Assumption College in Bangkok for his high school. He was a president of journal and public relation club and a member of foreign affair club in Phramongkutklao medical cadet union. He is interesting in non-communicable diseases and want to continue working on this researh title in the future for more precise information. Currently, he is working on a project about influence Factors on Influenza Vaccination among Primary School Students’ Guardian in Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya Province.

Abstract:

Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are major non-communicable diseases and public health problems. Though many researches were conducted but only few was in rural area. This study objective was to identify factors associated to diabetic and hypertension control. A mixed-method design, a cross-sectional quantitative study and focus-group discussion for qualitative study, was used. We used a standard quantitative questionnaire to collect participants’ demographic data and potential associated factors. Qualitative study was done to determine participants’ associated charactistics. The result revealed that prevalence of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (n = 232) was below the national average at 54.4%. Factors associated to poor glycemic control were < 60 years old (OR = 3.25, 95%CI: 1.09-9.71, p = 0.002), hypertension as comorbid (OR = 0.05, 95%CI: 0.01-0.36, p = 0.003) and difficulty in getting medicine (OR = 13.71, 95%CI: 1.04-180.43, p = 0.046). The prevalence of poorly controlled hypertension (n =153) was below the national average at 42.2%. Associated factors for poor hypertension control were age (OR = 1.06 , 95%CI: 1-1.13, p = 0.038), obesity (OR = 4.57, 95%CI: 1.5-13.97, p = 0.008) and drug adherence (OR = 3.25, 95%CI: 1.09-9.71). Furthermore in qualitative study we found that difficulty in getting medicine, dietary factors and no community exercise are associate to poor blood pressure and glycemic control. In conclusion, This data will then lead to development of self-care program, to decrease risk of complications and to establish new public health policies for other rural comunities. Despite all significant factors, more research should be conduct to gain better understanding.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-13:40 @ Salamanca

Haci Omer Yilmaz

Ankara University, Turkey

Title: Factors affecting the status of obesity in school-age children

Time : 13:40-13:55

Speaker
Biography:

Haci Omer Yilmaz graduated from Afyon Kocatepe University in 2013 and he is a research assistant in Nutrition and Dietetics Departmant of Ankara University. At same time, he is doing master in Nutrition and Dietetics.

Abstract:

Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in many countries. Overweight and obesity in childhood are known to have significant impact on both physical and psychological health. Environmental factors, lifestyle preferences, and cultural environment play roles in the rising prevalence of obesity worldwide. The aim of this study; school-age children's eating habits, physical activity levels, and to determine the factors affecting the status of obesity. In the study, 172 boys, 186 girls 11-12 years of aged, a total of 358 children examined. Anthropometric measurements were taken and family factors, eating habits, physical activity time has been questioned. The children in the study by gender, age, weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-hip ratio and analyzed the distribution of the body mass index (BMI) according to WHO-2007. Overall average BMI for boys 18.9±3.5 kg/m2, for girls 18.4±3.2 kg/m2. Prevalences of overweight (≥85.-<95. percentiles) and obesity (≥95. percentile) for all children %16.2 and %15.4 respectively. Children who are obese individuals in family average body weight of 43.2 ± 10.61 kg, BMI was 19.4 ± 3.91 kg/m2, while non-obese family members of students' body weight and body mass index respectively was 39.4±7.96 kg to 18.1±2.75 kg/m2 (p<0.05). Eat something before go to sleep and haven't breakfast affect obesity prevalence negatively. Monitoring of obesity at school age children and developing school health programs will be an investment in public health for the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Witchakorn Trisukon, 5th year medical student, is currently studying in Phramongkutklao college of medicine, Thailand and will graduate in 2017. He is interesting psychiatry and eager to conduct a research about depression in future. By co-operate with his colleague and advice from supervisors, this abstract is his 1st research paper and will be published in near future.

Abstract:

Blastocystis sp., an intestinal protozoan, is commonly identified in humans and animals worldwide, especially in developing countries. The evidence of Blastocystis sp. as a pathogen has been accumulated in recent years. Blastocystis sp. is transmitted by feco-oral route. In Thailand, the prevalences of Blastocystis infection were different in each community and population. This study aimed to identify prevalence of Blastocystis infection among primary school students in a rural community and identify association factors of the infection. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Stool examinations including wet preparation, and culture using Jones’ medium were performed to detect Blastocystis infection. Kato, formalin-ethyl acetate concentration and agar plate techniques also were used to detect other intestinal parasitic infections. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess risk behaviors. Of 501 stool specimens, there are 64 specimens (12.8%) positive for Blastocystis sp. Other intestinal parasitic infections were founded including Giardia duodenalis (1.4%), Entamoeba coli (1.0%), Opisthorchis viverrini (0.8%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.6%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.4%). Studying in some particular schools was associated with acquiring the infection. Intestinal protozoa infections are predominant in this population. According to interview with school director, source of drinking are suspected environmental factor causing Blastocystis sp. infection. Quality of water should be further investigated.

Speaker
Biography:

Svetlana Stolarov has completed her Master degree in chemistry at University of Basel in 2013. Currently she is a PhD student in Prof. Cornelia Palivan`s group at University of Basel.

Abstract:

The interest to apply nanotechnology in food preservation and in food quality control largely increased in last few years. The development of active packaging materials which are able to interact with substances produced during the food decay and preserve the quality by releasing the active compounds or to sense its decay at the early stage, is very important issue to be address .[1, 2] The aim of our project is to develop the method for long-term immobilization of nanoscaled containers such as polymer vesicles (polymersomes) on the solid support. The active compounds are stored in polymer vesicles attached to the packaging surface and are released into the food upon first signs of decline in the freshness of the food. The polymersomes, formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers, were covalently attached via hydrazone bonds on the glass surface. Since, the prerequisite of such systems is to fulfil healthy and safety issues, a high stability of the attached nanocontainers is required. The architecture and stability of attached vesicles were not affected for more than 11 months under dry conditions. The glass surfaces before and after vesicle attachment were characterized by contact angle, AFM and QCM techniques. The stability of active surfaces under `wet` conditions and various pH media, as well as the immobilization on other surfaces, is still under investigation.

Speaker
Biography:

Korranit was born in Bangkok, Thailand. She has completed her high school from Triamudomsuksa high school and is studying Medicine in Phramongkutklao College of Medicine. She took part in 1st International Conference of Military Medical Schools 2015 as a liaison.

Abstract:

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is an essential complication of diabetes as it can result in blindness. Unfortunately, the prevalence of DR is increasing worldwide. Many studies were done in hospital-based but not many concern in community. Cross-sectional study was carried out during 21th-25th November 2015 to determine the prevalence of DR and its associated factors in diabetic patients in rural community, central Thailand. The subjects in the present registry were diabetic patients who were treated in the local sanitarium and agreed to participate in this registry. The diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was made according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria. Fundus examination is done by using fundus photography and diagnosed by an ophthalmologist. The total number of diabetic patients for analysis was 238 patients. Among these patients, the prevalence of DR was 15.5% (n=37) diagnosed using fundus photography. Male (20.4%) was more likely to be DR than female (16.4%). Associated factors which considered significant were age ≤60 years old (25.6%)(OR=3.01, 95%CI: 1.17-7.73, p=0.013) and underlying of renal disease(OR=4.04, 95%CI: 1.23-13.21, p=0.006). The study shows high prevalence of DR in the rural community which healthcare provider should provided opportunity to assess eye examination for diabetic patients by an ophthalmologist to reduce risk of blindness.

Speaker
Biography:

Karine Goueslard from CHRU Dijon, France

Abstract:

Background : In France, in order to assess public health policy for the perinatal period, it is necessary to have available routinely produced indicators from the whole population. These indicators are used to compare French public health policy with that of other European countries. The PMSI’s administrative and medical data may provide valuable information for research; these data are simple and reliable. The study aims to measure the PMSI data’s quality for core indicators in perinatal health in three university health centres. Method: PMSI’s data were compared with medical files from 300 live births in 2012, after 22 weeks of amenorrhea, drawn at random from the CHUs in Dijon, Paris and Nancy. The variables were chosen based on the Europeristat project’s core and recommended indicators, as well as those of the Enquete Nationale Périnatale in 2010. The information gathered blindly from the medical files was compared with the PMSI data, the quality of which was estimated with the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and the sensitivity. Results: The data about maternal age, parity and mode of delivery as well as the rates of premature births can be superimposed between the two sources. The PPV for epidural is 96.2% and 94.3% for perineal tears. Overall, maternal morbidity is underdocumented in the PMSI, so the PPV is 100.0% for pre-existing diabetes, 88.9% for gestational diabetes and 100.0% for high blood pressure with a rate of 9.0% in PMSI and 6.3% in the medical files. The PPV for bleeding during labour is 89.5%. Conclusion: To conclude, the PMSI’s data are seemingly becoming more and more reliable for two reasons: on one hand, the importance of these data for budgetary promotion in hospitals; on the other, the increasing use of this information for statistical and epidemiological purposes.

Speaker
Biography:

Dalia has completed her Pharm D at the age of 27 years from Alexandria University and she is now a PhD candidate from High Institute of Public Health, Alexandria University. She is an Assisstant Lecturer at Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharos University.She is a Board member in Association of Applying and Developing Pharmacy (AADP), a non profit organization based in Alexandria, Egypt.

Abstract:

Background information: The WHO referred public health to all organized measures to prevent disease, promote health, and prolong life among the population. Pharmacists, as health professionals, have the potential to bridge communication gaps that exist due to health literacy among people through educating the public about changes in lifestyle, nutrition and hand hygiene. Purpose: Children are among the vulnerable groups who have a great impact on their families. Lacking of a comprehensive health education program in our schools necessitates the pharmacists’ participation in health education for children as a part of their role in public health. Methods: The Association of Applying and Developing Pharmacy (AADP) adopted “Protect your child” project designed by Healthy Egyptians’ association. We educated children through using tools including, a cartoon movie, coloring books and educative puppet show designed to educate children about pneumonia and anemia. Results: Education was delivered among children in schools, and hospitals. We started in September 2014 where we have contributed in the education of 325 child. During 2015 we reached 1205 child, and 148 adults (representing parents). We also represented our association in national radio and television of Alexandria to reach more audience. Conclusion: Involvement of pharmacists in educating children through the use of creative ways is among the forgotten areas of practice. An important part of reducing burden of disease especially in the future includes health education for children. Recommendations: We recommend the use of campaigns which are directed to both children and parents. Furthermore, more research is needed to measure the impact of educating children on reducing disease burden.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 15:45-16:05 @ Salamanca